Benj Hellie

benjhellie-utoronto-philosophy-2.jpeg

Position:

Professor

Campus:

UTSC,

Email Address:

Phone Number:

416-208-4843

Fax Number:

416-208-2669

Biography:

  • BA, Stanford University
  • PhD, Princeton University

Professor Hellie’s research interests include philosophy of mind (consciousness, rationality, intentionality, perception, action); epistemology and philosophical semantics (traditional and formal); and the history of analytical philosophy (especially David Lewis). His central research program explores the prospects and consequences of abandoning the centrality of truth to the theory of meaning: in particular, of reconciling the structures and concerns of the analytical tradition with an ‘antirealist’ approach to mind characteristic of the hermeneutical tradition.

For more information, please visit Professor Hellie’s personal website.

Research Interests:

Epistemology, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Mind

Publications:

  • “Relativized metaphysical modality”, with Adam Russell Murray and Jessica Wilson, Routledge Handbook of Modality, Ottavio Bueno and Scott Shalkowski, editors, 2018.
  • “An analytic–hermeneutic history of Consciousness”, Cambridge History of Philosophy: 1945–2015, Kelly Michael Becker and Iain Thomson, editors, 2018.
  • “Praxeology, imperatives, and shifts of view”, Process, Action, and Experience, Rowland Stout, editor, OUP, 2018.
  • “David Lewis and the Kangaroo: Graphing philosophical progress”, Philosophy’s Future: The Problem of Philosophical Progress, Russell Blackford and Damien Broderick, editors, Blackwell, 2017.
  • “Rationalization and the Ross Paradox”, Deontic Modality, Nate Charlow and Matthew Chrisman, editors, OUP, 2016.
  • “Love in the time of cholera”, Does Perception Have Content?, Brit Brogaard, editor, OUP, 2014.
  • “There it is”, Philosophical Issues, 2011.
  • “Factive phenomenal characters”, Philosophical Perspectives, 2007.
  • “Noise and perceptual indiscriminability”, Mind, 2005.

Address:

Philosophy Hall (PO 102), 1265 Military Trail, Scarborough, ON M1C 1A4

Secondary Address:

Jackman Humanities Institute (room 413), 170 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5R 2M8