Winter 2018 UTSC Courses

PHLA11: Introduction to Ethics
Instructor: Dr. W. Hussain
Lecture: Tuesday / Thursday, 11am-12pm

Please consult the UTSC Timetable for tutorial scheduling.

Description:
Ethics is concerned with concrete questions about how we ought to treat one another as well as more general questions about how to justify our ethical beliefs. This course is an introduction that both presents basic theories of ethics and considers their application to contemporary moral problems.

PHLB02: Environmental Ethics
Instructor: Dr. J. Rick
Lecture: Wednesday, 1-3pm / Friday, 2-3pm

Description:
This course examines ethical issues raised by our actions and our policies for the environment. Do human beings stand in a moral relationship to the environment? Does the environment have moral value and do non-human animals have moral status? These fundamental questions underlie more specific contemporary issues such as sustainable development, alternative energy, and animal rights.

PHLB07: Ethics
Instructor: Dr. J. Brandt
Lecture: Wednesday, 12-1pm / Friday, 12-2pm

Description:
What is the difference between right and wrong? What is ‘the good life’? What is well-being? What is autonomy? These notions are central in ethical theory, law, bioethics, and in the popular imagination. In this course we will explore these concepts in greater depth, and then consider how our views about them shape our views about ethics.

PHLB09: Biomedical Ethics
Instructor: Dr. J. Brandt
Lecture: Thursday, 7-9pm

Please consult the UTSC Timetable for tutorial scheduling.

Description:
This course is an examination of moral and legal problems in medical practice, in biomedical research, and in the development of health policy. Topics may include: concepts of health and disease, patients’ rights, informed consent, allocation of scarce resources, euthanasia, risks and benefits in research and others.

PHLB17: Introduction to Political Philosophy
Instructor: Dr. J. Rick
Lecture: Tuesday, 10am-1pm

Description:
This course will introduce some important concepts of and thinkers in political philosophy from the history of political philosophy to the present. These may include Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, G.W.F. Hegel, John Stuart Mill, or Karl Marx. Topics discussed may include political and social justice, liberty and the criteria of good government.

PHLB31: Introduction to Ancient Philosophy
Instructor: Dr. J. Rick
Lecture: Wednesday, 10-11am / Friday, 10am-12pm

Description:
A survey of some main themes and figures of ancient philosophical thought, concentrating on Plato and Aristotle. Topics include the ultimate nature of reality, knowledge, and the relationship between happiness and virtue.

PHLB60: Introduction to Metaphysics
Instructor: Dr. C. DiCarlo
Lecture: Tuesday, 7-10pm

Description:
A consideration of problems in metaphysics: the attempt to understand ‘how everything fits together’ in the most general sense of this phrase. Some issues typically covered include: the existence of God, the nature of time and space, the nature of mind and the problem of the freedom of the will.

PHLB81: Theories of Mind
Instructor: Dr. K. Boyd
Lecture: Monday, 11am-1pm / Wednesday, 11am-12pm

Description:
An examination of questions concerning the nature of mind. Philosophical questions considered may include: what is consciousness, what is the relation between the mind and the brain, how did the mind evolve and do animals have minds, what is thinking, what are feelings and emotions, and can machines have minds.

PHLC06: Topics in Ethical Theory
Instructor: Dr. J. Brandt
Lecture: Tuesday, 11am-12pm / Thursday, 9am-11am

Description:
Philosophical ethics simultaneously aims to explain what ethics is, why it matters, and what it tells us to do. This is what is meant by the phrase ‘ethical theory.’ In this class we will explore specific topics in ethical theory in some depth. Specific topics may vary with the instructor.

PHLC20: Theory of Knowledge
Instructor: Dr. K. Boyd
Lecture: Monday, 3-4pm / Wednesday, 3-5pm

Description:
A follow up to PHLB20H3. This course will consider one or two epistemological topics in depth, with an emphasis on class discussion.

PHLC36: Topics in Early Modern Philosophy: Empiricism
Instructor: Dr. J. Wilson
Lecture: Monday, 3-5pm

Description:
In this course we study major figures of early modern empiricism, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, with a particular emphasis on topics such as substance, knowledge and sense perception, the mind-body problem, and the existence and nature of God.

PHLC43: History of Analytic Philosophy
Instructor: Dr. B. Hellie
Lecture: Wednesday, 1-3pm

Description:
This course explores the foundation of Analytic Philosophy in the late 19th and early 20th century, concentrating on Frege, Russell, and Moore. Special attention paid to the discovery of mathematical logic, its motivations from and consequences for metaphysics and the philosophy of mind.

PHLC51: Symbolic Logic II
Instructor: Dr. P. Kremer
Lecture: Monday, 11am-1pm / Friday, 11am-12pm

Description:
After consolidating the material from Symbolic Logic I, we will introduce necessary background for metalogic, the study of the properties of logical systems. We will introduce set theory, historically developed in parallel to logic. We conclude with some basic metatheory of the propositional logic learned in Symbolic Logic I.

PHLC80: Philosophy of Language
Instructor: Dr. P. Kremer
Lecture: Monday, 2-3pm / Friday, 1-3pm

Description:
An examination of philosophical issues about language. Philosophical questions to be covered include: what is the relation between mind and language, what is involved in linguistic communication, is language an innate biological feature of human beings, how do words manage to refer to things, and what is meaning.

PHLC99: Philosophical Development Seminar
Instructor: Dr. W. Hussain
Lecture: Tuesday, 12-2pm / Thursday, 1-2pm

Description:
This course aims to foster a cohesive cohort among philosophy specialists and majors. The course is an intensive seminar that will develop advanced philosophical skills by focusing on textual analysis, argumentative techniques, writing and oral presentation. Students will work closely with the instructor and their peers to develop a conference-style, research-length paper. Each year, the course will focus on a different topic drawn from the core areas of philosophy for its subject matter. This course is strongly recommended for students in the Specialist and Major programs in Philosophy.

PHLD78: Advanced Seminar in Political Philosophy
Instructor: Dr. W. Hussain
Lecture: Wednesday, 11am-1pm

Description:
This advanced seminar will delve more deeply into an issue in political philosophy. Topics will vary from year to year, but some examples include: distributive justice, human rights, and the political morality of freedom. Students will be required to present material to the class at least once during the semester.